Last edited by Voodoosida
Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

6 edition of De Gaulle and his France found in the catalog.

De Gaulle and his France

a psychopolitical and historical portrait.

by Jacques de Launay

  • 372 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Julian Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gaulle, Charles de, 1890-1970

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. [293]-296.

    StatementTranslated by Dorothy Albertyn.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDC373.G3 L353
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 316 p.
    Number of Pages316
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5611240M
    LC Control Number68019017

    “Jackson’s riveting biography of Charles de Gaulle portrays a divisive, self-contradictory but still legendary figure; the book also vividly profiles twentieth-century France from the disillusionment of the First World War to the dislocations of the s. De Gaulle represented the steely warlike France, summoned up by Bonaparte and again a century later at Verdun, for which the French were required to die and mourn uncomplainingly. For him, Paris was well worth a lie or a betrayal, because his supremacy was so essential for the country he loved. The costs of de Gaulle’s idea of France were high.

    The Fall of France: The Nazi Invasion of , , etc.) notes, de Gaulle was not easy to peg politically. He emerged from a tradition of “social Catholicism” that “sought to overcome class struggle by finding a middle way between capitalism and socialism.” What de Gaulle was, pre-eminently, was French, fervently devoted to his nation. “FRANCE HAS LOST A BATTLE! BUT FRANCE HAS NOT LOST THE WAR!”: GENERAL DE GAULLE’S “CALL TO ARMS”—ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS POSTERS IN THE HISTORY OF WWII AND FREE FRANCE (WORLD WAR II) (DE GAULLE, Charles). French WWII Poster. London: Fosh & Cross, circa Single sheet measuring /2 by 10 inches, printed on recto and verso.

      Insisting “France is not really herself unless in the front rank,” in the s de Gaulle elbowed his way into the select club of nuclear powers, even as he relinquished an empire and.   De Gaulle, the man of action, was a character in an epic poem written by de Gaulle, the creator; Mr. Ledwidge quotes from a war diary of August , when de Gaulle had his .


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De Gaulle and his France by Jacques de Launay Download PDF EPUB FB2

Charles de Gaulle had 'a certain idea of France' which even he didn't manage to articulate clearly. De Gaulle biographer and one of Britain's leading historians of modern France, Julian Jackson, talks us through some key books to get a sense of France's wartime leader and president, Charles de Gaulle.

Verdict of De Gaulle, in his book France and its army, was perceptive: “Napoleon left France crushed, invaded, drained of blood and courage, smaller than he had found it Napoleon exhausted the good will of the French people, abused his sacrifices, covered Europe with tombs, ashes and tears. De Gaulle’s verdict, in his book France and Her Army, was perceptive: “Napoleon left France crushed, invaded, drained of blood and courage, smaller than he had found it Napoleon.

Charles de Gaulle, Julian Jackson insists in the preface of his new biography, “De Gaulle” (Harvard), is “everywhere” in modern France, its undisputed claim, like some other. After his resignation, de Gaulle retired to his home in Colombey-les-Deux-Eglises.

He had little time to enjoy the quiet life of this village, as he died of a heart attack on November 9, Born:   Thanks to de Gaulle, France was recognized as one of the victorious Allies when Germany was finally defeated.

Then, as President of the Fifth Republic, he brought France to the brink of a civil war over his controversial decision to pull out of Algeria. He challenged American hegemony, took France out of NATO, and twice vetoed British entry Reviews: The book opens with the author's memory of meeting de Gaulle and closes with his reflections on French culture.

French history is so intertwined with that of Britain. However, the book does seem to be titled wrongly, saying it runs from Gaul to de Gaulle. The book's narrative ends abruptly in /5().

De Gaulle, by Julian Jackson (Belknap Press of Harvard University, pp., $). C harles de Gaulle was perhaps the most thoughtful and impressive statesman of the twentieth century.

His only possible rival in this regard is Winston Churchill, another statesman-thinker, though Churchill presided over a longstanding, stable, and free political order in the United Kingdom, something on. Fiercely nationalistic, De Gaulle was driven by the belief that it was his destiny to save France.

To tell the life of De Gaulle is also to chart the history of modern France, and in this suitably. De Gaulle was the de facto leader of the Free French nation, that is, those French citizens who refused to acknowledge or accept the rule of Germany or Vichy France under the elderly General Petain.

De Gaulle rubbed Roosevelt the wrong way, but Eisenhower understood his indispensability. De Gaulle was forced to resign the presidency in in the face mass strikes and demonstrations across France, as well as the failure of his referendum on further political reform.

De Gaulle did that in his supreme moment in Junewhen he caught a ride on a plane to England as the Wehrmacht tore through France, and convinced Churchill to adopt him as a symbol of France. Charles de Gaulle, savior of France’s honor and founder of the Fifth Republic, was a deeply contradictory politician.

A conservative and a Catholic, from a monarchist family, he restored democracy in and brought the Communists into his government. An imperialist in the s, he oversaw France’s de–colonialization in the s. A soldier, he spent much of his career opposing the army. When General de Gaulle published the first volume of his war memoirs inhe signed only four presentation copies: for the Pope, the Comte de Paris (France’s royalist pretender), the.

Two years later, inde Gaulle was dead. Despite his wishes for a private funeral, millions thronged his village to mourn. “France is widowed,” said Pompidou, who gathered the world’s great at Notre Dame cathedral to pay him homage. Today, no name is more honored in France than de Gaulle’s.

Charles de Gaulle, saviour of France's honour in and founder of the Fifth Republic inwas a man of contradictions. A conservative who brought the communists into his government and an imperialist who completed France's decolonisation in Algeria/5.

As the title implies, yes, Charles De Gaulle did save France, and he “saved” it on more than one occasion. For me, the story that was the most engrossing was the role De Gaulle played in World War II. At the conclusion of World War II, the story then shifts to De Gaulle’s political life. Sadly, this is where the book became about as Cited by:   In his attempt to reduce American influence on the continent, De Gaulle withdrew France from NATO’s integrated military structure in (Moravcsik, ).

He also vetoed Britain’s entry into the EEC twice in and because he considered “perfidious Albion” to. Posted to Beirut, de Gaulle wrote the second of his books during the inter-war period, The Edge of the Sword, a brilliant reflection on leadership, which also attacked the drift in France towards.

A military autocracy was too narrow for such wide-scope endeavors. De Gaulle was able to frame the issue from a wider civilian point of view, rare for a professional military officer. After the war and active service in Poland inde Gaulle returned and wrote his first book. In a definitive biography of the mythic general who refused to accept Nazi domination of France, Julian Jackson captures this titanic figure as never before.

Drawing on unpublished letters, memoirs, and resources of the recently opened de Gaulle archive, he shows how this volatile visionary put a broken France back at the center of world affairs. According to Elliott Roosevelt in his book, As He Saw It (New York, ), Franklin Roosevelt distrusted de Gaulle for three reasons: one having to do with the status of the French empire, another with the status of the French regime, and a third involving the shape of the French state after World War II.

FDR was shocked by the sudden defeat of France in   When de Gaulle gave his dramatic televised address of Apas he faced down army officers attempting a putsch to preserve France’s sovereignty over Algeria, he wore his general’s uniform for a reason. It was all about conjuring up the unique status which June 18 had conferred upon him: something possessed by no-one else.